evajohannastudios

The Devil is in the Details

There was  a lottery a while back to support a 20 year celebration the SCA group in Europe celebrates in June next year. I donated a pendant to be done after the winner’s wishes, and the lady who won my prize is a beautiful Lady of the Rose and she wanted a rose pendant. She is a lady of muted colours and wanted something blingy but not bright, and you can see what I came up with. It actually matches a coronet I made for the same lady a while back, so I’m pleased with it. But it’s not the pendant I want to talk about.

It’s the litte bail it’s hanging from.

I’ve been making renaissance pendants for a while now, and when I study period paintings I realize that they like to wear the pendants in many different ways. They can be hanging in a chain, or from a silk ribbon, or from a strand of pearls, or pinned to a bodice or a hat, and that is just a few examples.

So how could I make my pendants so they can be easily transferred between a silk ribbon and a strand of pearls? A while back I started to make little hooks, which work quite well and are pretty, but I don’t have any historical evidence for them. But this last Saturday I had a bit of an Eureka moment! While looking for something completely different, I noticed the pendant Lady Margaret Lee holds in her hand in this 1540 portrait by Hans Holbein The Younger: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Hans_Holbein_d._J._034.jpg  (I’ve added a detail of the portrait in my photo composite below)

The bail looks like a little spiral with an open end! So, I had to try to make one. And if you look at my photo below you see how my first experiment turned out. It looks OK I think, and it’s VERY functional. I can easily transfer the pendant from one place to another, and there is little risk that it will fall off. So, this is quite possible how I will make most of my bails from now on, until I found documentation for something even more clever…

© Johanna Lundqvist Lawrence

The rose pendant with the interesting bail. And you can also see the back of the pendant. I try to always make the back of my jewelry as thought through as the front. It needs to look great when laying around too, such is my philosophy.

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Contact/Impressum

Johanna Lundqvist Lawrence
// Frankenstr. 9,
90762 Fürth,
Germany
// evajohannalundqvist
(at)
gmail.com

All text and images posted in this blog are copyright Johanna Lundqvist Lawrence, if nothing else is stated. Non commercial attributed use is fine. If in doubt, please ask.

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